Association | Home | Stabijhoun | Frisian Water Dog (Wetterhoun) | Puppies | Breeding | Additional
Nederlandse Vereniging voor Stabij- en Wetterhounen

History

Staby originates from Friesland and in particular from the Frisian forest area, a region in the southeast and east of Friesland. The breed has long been known in these parts, but has only become more famous since the sixties outside Friesland. Already in the nineteenth century in various texts (eg Joost Halbertsma, Waling Dijkstra and Nynke fan Hichtum) reported "Bijke" which was described as a "long-haired piebald", including "a child's friend" and a "good hunting dog". The ancestors can most likely be traced to the spanjoel (or spaniel), who had come during the Spanish occupation to the north. There is probably a strong relationship between the Staby, the Small Munsterlander, and the Drentsche Patrijshond. Staby were used for hunting moles, rats and skunks, as a watchdog and as a pest exterminator in the yard and around the house. They were also occasionally trained as a hunting dog for wild hare and upland birds. In the latter case, it was mainly a matter of hunting by poachers because the Staby was not a dog of the nobility, but the small farmer. The Stabyhoun was originally the dog of the "little guy", the day labourer, farmers or small landholders. It is a very versatile dog that is now mainly a companion dog. The breed was recognized by the Dutch Kennel Club in 1942, and has been an AKC-FSS breed since 2006. The Stabyhoun belongs to Group 7, Pointing Dogs within the FCI.

The name Stabyhoun can be translated to the words “stand by me”, and this refers to their multipurpose. In Dutch, we say stabijhoun, whereas “houn” is the Frisian word for “dog”. Stabys are independent. Some people call it cockiness, others call it stubbornness or obstinance. But, in fact, it is independence, and that is something that is deliberately bred. The farmers wanted a dog that could work independently. And that property Stabys have retained still today. In case of insufficient and / or inconsistent guidance, a Stabyhoun can develop into a difficult and unstable dog. With proper guidance, you will have in a Staby, an adorable dog and a great friend for life.
Stabys are very inquisitive. A nice feature, but at the same time they can also get into trouble. Generally they expect the boss to offer a helping hand. So always pay attention to what a Stabyhoun is up to, because with their inquisitive nature they also can fairly quickly find themselves in a difficult position.



Overview of the Stabijhoun population

Data 2011 Club Established Members Stabijs Litter in 2010 Total litters Breeders
Netherlands NVSW 1947 2500 3650 70 (via NVSW) 1988 240
Sweden SvSK 2000 280 725 12 (34 pups) 106 32
Denmark DASK 2001 175 375 8 (49 pups) 55 15
Finland SCF 2006 120 272 4 (22 pups) 36 12
USA-Canada ASA 2006 110 210 4 (15 pups) 14 9
Norway NoSC 2007 93 100 2 (17 pups) 5 3